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A Comprehensive List of Lighthouses in Maine

Maine Lighthouse

Lighthouses have been the focal point of many poems, songs, and books for several decades, possibly even for 2,000 years, since the very first known lighthouse was built in Egypt. So what is it about lighthouses that we are so drawn to? Perhaps it’s the symbol of consistent reliability that we so often long for in our lives; Or the symbol of hope amid overwhelming storms; Or of light overcoming the darkness. The list could go on and on. Lighthouses have provided both physical and emotional safety for millions of people for thousands of years. No matter your reason for loving lighthouses, this list of lighthouses in Maine will arm you with all of the info you’ll need to start exploring these inspiring symbols of hope.

Maine Lighthouse
Photo by Maxim Boldyrev

“Like a simple little lighthouse, my true ideal is to just be. Having no trace of seeking, desiring, imitating, or striving. Only light and peace.” -Bodhi Smith

Visiting lighthouses is a growing hobby and passion for many people. The US alone has around 700 lighthouses, and Maine has 64 lighthouses that are still standing. Whether it’s the symbolism, meaning, architecture, travel, ocean, nature, or history that you love, you’re sure to find joy and fulfillment while exploring and visiting as many lighthouses as you can.

If you live in or near Maine, we can help you fulfill your bucket list goals to visit every coastal lighthouse! We’ve written up this comprehensive list of lighthouses in Maine for you to be able to refer back to while tracking your visits. The list includes the 64 coastal lighthouses in Maine that are still standing, the date the current light was built, and how to best view or access each light. We also poured our hearts into designing this beautiful laser engraved bucket list board for lighthouses in Maine. All 64 of the lighthouses are intricately engraved onto 64 removable pieces. The board can serve as an elegant home decor piece, a unique conversation starter, and a visual tracker for which lighthouses in Maine you’ve visited, and which ones are still on your bucket list!

List of Lighthouses in Maine

Baker Island Light: Built in 1855. Only accessible by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Bass Harbor Head Light: Built in 1858. Accessible by car. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public, but the grounds are.

Bear Island Light: Built in 1839. Only accessible by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Blue Hill Bay Light: Built in 1857. Best viewed by boat. The lighthouse and the island are privately owned, and not open to the public.

Boon Island Light: Built in 1855. Can be seen from the shore, but best viewed by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Browns Head Light: Built in 1857. Only accessible by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Burnt Coat Harbor Light: Built in 1872. Only accessibly by boat. The lighthouse is open to the public during specific hours in the summer. The light keeper’s house apartment is available for vacation rentals.

Burnt Island Light: Built in 1821. Only accessible by boat. Lighthouse educational tours are offered twice a week.

Cape Elizabeth Light: Built in 1874. Best viewed by car. The lighthouse and grounds are privately owned, and not open to the public.

Cape Neddick Nubble Light: Built in 1879. Best viewed by car, from Nubble Point. The lighthouse and island are not open to the public.

Cuckolds Light: Built in 1907. Best viewed by boat. The lighthouse and grounds are not open to the public.

Curtis Island Light: Built in 1896. Best viewed by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Deer Island Thorofare Light: Built in 1858. Best viewed by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Dyce Head Light: Built in 1828. Accessible by car. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Doubling Point Light: Built in 1898. Accessible by car. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Doubling Point Range Lights: Accessible by car. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Eagle Island Light: Built in 1839. Best viewed by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Egg Rock Light: Built in 1875. Best viewed by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Fort Point Light: Built in 1857. Accessible by car. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Franklin Island Light: Built in 1855. Only accessible by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Goat Island Light: Built in 1859. Best viewed by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Goose Rocks Light: Built in 1890. Best viewed by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Great Duck Island Light: Built in 1890. Best viewed by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Grindle Point Light: Built in 1874. Best viewed by boat. Lighthouse Museum is occasionally open.

Halfway Rock Light: Built in 1871. Best viewed by car from the southern tip of Bailey Island. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Hendricks Head Light: Built in 1875. Best viewed by car from West Southport, or by boat. The lighthouse and grounds are not open to the public.

Heron Neck Light: Built in 1854. Best viewed by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Indian Island Light: Built in 1875. Best viewed by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Isle Au Haut Light: Built in 1907. Accessible by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Libby Island Light: Built in 1823. Best viewed by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Little River Light: Built in 1876. Accessible by boat. Overnight stays can be booked in advance.

Lubec Channel Light: Built in 1890. Best viewed by car from Lubec. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Marshall Point Light: Built in 1857. Accessible by car. A museum is open to the public. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Matinicus Rock Light: Built in 1857. Best viewed by boat. Public access is very limited.

Monhegan Light: Built in 1850. Accessible by boat. A museum is open to the public. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Moose Peak Light: Built in 1851. Best viewed by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Mount Desert Rock Light: Built in 1847. Best viewed by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Narraguagus Light: Built in 1853. Best viewed by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Nash Island Light: Built in 1874. Best viewed by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Owls Head Light: Built in 1852. Accessible by car. The lighthouse is open on specific days to the public.

Pemaquid Point Light: Built in 1835. Accessible by car. The lighthouse is open on specific days to the public. The light keeper’s house apartment is available for vacation rentals.

Perkins Island Light: Built in 1898. Best viewed by boat. The lighthouse and grounds are closed to the public.

Petit Manan Light: Built in 1855. Best viewed by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Pond Island Light: Built in 1855. Best viewed by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Portland Breakwater Light: Built in 1875. Accessible by car. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Portland Head Light: Built in 1791. Accessible by car. A museum is open to the public. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Prospect Harbor Light: Built in 1891. Best viewed by car from The Rocky Beach. The lighthouse and grounds are closed to the public.

Pumpkin Island Light: Built in 1854. Best viewed by car from the mainland. The lighthouse and grounds are closed to the public.

Ram Island Light: Built in 1883. Accessible by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public. The grounds are open by appointment only.

Ram Island Ledge Light: Built in 1905. Best viewed by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Rockland Breakwater Light: Built in 1902. Best viewed by walking the 1 mile long breakwater. The lighthouse may be open for private tours.

Rockland Harbor Southwest Light: Built in 1987. Best viewed by boat. The lighthouse and grounds are not open to the public.

Saddleback ledge Light: Built in 1839. Best viewed by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Seguin Island Light: Built in 1857. Accessible by boat. The lighthouse is open for occasional tours. Overnight accommodations on the island are available.

Spring Point Ledge Light: Built in 1897. Best viewed by car or walking along the breakwater. The lighthouse is open to the public during specified open houses.

Squirrel Point Light: Built in 1898. Best viewed by walking the trail at the end of Bald Head Road, or by car from across the Kennebec River. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Tenants Harbor Light: Built in 1858. Best viewed by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Two Bush Island Light: Built in 1897. Best viewed by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

West Quoddy Head Light: Built in 1857. Accessible by car. A museum is open to the public. The lighthouse is open on specific days. Overnight accommodations are available.

Whaleback Light: Built in 1872. Best viewed by car or boat. The lighthouse itself is closed to the public.

Whitehead Light: Built in 1852. Best viewed by boat. The lighthouse is only open by special appointment. Overnight accommodations on the island are available.

Whitlocks Mill Light: Built in 1910. Best viewed by car. The lighthouse and grounds are closed to the public.

Winter Harbor Light: Built in 1857. Best viewed by boat. The lighthouse itself is not open to the public.

Wood Island Light: Established in 1839. Accessible by boat. The grounds and lighthouse are open to the public only through guided tours.

This list of lighthouses in Maine does not include lakeside lighthouses or lighthouses that are no longer standing. We hope it will help you reach your bucket list goal of visiting every lighthouse in Maine!

Lighthouses in Maine with overnight accommodations

Here at Whake Studios, we’re passionate about supporting you and your dreams! No matter what bucket list goals you have, we can help! Love hiking? Check out our New Hampshire 52 with a view bucket list board. Love traveling? Check out our US National Parks Bucket List Board, or our national parks travel guide. Whatever you do, stop dreaming and start living!

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